Still Sorting Out The Issue

I’ve found more stuff about homosexuality. I’m including these links here for my own benefit, so I don’t go searching for them and find that I’ve lost them in everything I read online.

My dear friend Steven’s opinions: Via Someone Else’s Article. He’s also got a letter to Apple two posts below this that has a less graceful opinion as well.

But to counter that is this beautifully simple display of girls who look healthy and happy to me. Of a conscious choice and conscious responsibility. My guess is that these girls would be insulted that I’m even teetering on the line, eyeing one side and then the other, trying out each side for temperature and texture.

I think my decision will end up being silent. I know people on both sides who love the texture of their side of the line. I love both sets of people. Deep down, I just don’t want to offend anyone because my heart is full of love for humanity. And love for love in general.

This is hard. And this is also the place where I ask for anyone else’s inclusion of links on the issue. Anybody? A cultured opinion that I haven’t read yet?

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About The Original Kate

Along with artistic tendencies, Kate enjoys unusual people and is constantly striving for some sort of nonconformity. Kate offers a perspective that is thoughtful but well-written and full of images within the words. Other tidbits that might intrigue: she has very long auburn hair, and, you guessed it, her favorite color is orange.

Posted on December 31, 2008, in From Rabid-Mormon Land Known As Utah. Bookmark the permalink. 13 Comments.

  1. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  2. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  3. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  4. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  5. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  6. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  7. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  8. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  9. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  10. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  11. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html

    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):

    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].

    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract

    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).

    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?

    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  12. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html
    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):
    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].
    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract
    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).
    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?
    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

  13. Here’s an article about the scientific link to homosexuality: http://allpsych.com/journal/homosexuality.html
    Of particular interest is this paragraph, dealing with structurral differences within the hypothalamus (the part of the brain which is largely responsible for hormones):
    Simon LeVay conducted another experiment regarding the hypothalamus of the human brain in 1991. LeVay, like Swaab and Allen also did a post-mortem examination on human brains; however, he did his examinations on patients who had died from AIDS-related illnesses. He examined 19 declared homosexual man, with a mean age of 38.2, 16 presumed heterosexual men, with a mean age of 42.8, and 6 presumed heterosexual women, with a mean age of 41.2 [3]. LeVay discovered that within the hypothalamus, the third interstitial notch of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH3) was two to three times smaller in homosexual men then in heterosexual men. The women examined also exhibited this phenomenon. LeVay concluded the “homosexual and heterosexual men differ in the central neuronal mechanisms that control sexual behavior”, and like Allen and Swaab, agreed that this difference in anatomy was no product of upbringing or environment, but rather prenatal cerebral development and structural differentiation [2].
    There is also this article (or rather the abstract from a scientific paper), linking homosexuality to fraternal birth order, which I think is totally fascinating: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11534970?dopt=Abstract
    I find it insulting to compare homosexuality to depression. What these two states of being have in common is that they are viewed negatively by the people who do not have them (for the most part). What they do not have in common is that the people experiencing these states of being view them as negative. Depressed individuals almost universally acknowledge that the depression is a very negative force on their life and causes them suffering, whereas homosexual individuals often find greater comfort, peace, and happiness in personal acceptance of their homosexuality. Usually when a homosexual individual finds that their sexual orientation causes them pain, it is when those around them judge them or make them feel less than for being the way that they are. Given the science, these two things don’t seem particularly linked to me, and I find that argument spurious. Particularly considering how many gay individuals come from your average suburban mother-father-boy-girl-religious upbringing. Where in that situation is nurture coming into the equation? I think that nurture can make it easier to realize and accept who you are as an individual, or make painful repression de riguer, but the I believe the state of homosexuality is biological (there are LOTS of studies on this, I encourage you to do more research).
    When you started having crushes on people in elementary school, you probably didn’t give it much thought. This boy was cute or that one let you borrow the red marker, and a crush was formed. Most homosexual attraction begins in the same way, impulsively, naturally, without a great deal of conscious thought. That’s one of the reasons I find the “it’s a choice” idea so strange. Did you choose to be attracted to men?
    I know I waffle on about this issue a lot when you bring it up, but it’s obviously something I’m pretty passionate about. I appreciate how hard it must be for you to search for your own answers on this, and I’m glad that you’re doing so.

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