The Black Sunburst, or, Another Battle Against Vermin

I sat down on my toilet right after I woke up today and saw a spider in my bathtub.

How is it that spiders just appear? We never see them arrive and take their places at the spots where we find them. In the first sixteen years of my life, had I seen the same spider, I would have screamed and avoided it at all costs. I would have also avoided the place where I saw it days after I dragged someone over to kill it. Now, my toes still crunch involuntarily when I have to interact with one, and I still jump at the first encounter.

I can kill it. I have the ability to do so now. That is the obvious fate for a spider once I’ve seen it co-existing in the same space as I. I can’t just let it live with me; it’s against my instinct. I also can’t trap it under a cup like a roly-poly or a Box Elder bug. Cannot. It must die.

The spiders in the bathtub prove the easiest to kill. It can’t escape those horizontal walls, and I’m taller than it. I was somewhat relieved that I had a use for those three extra jugs of water. They’ve been sitting on my kitchen floor, waiting to be emptied so I can pack them and then refill them in the new apartment. I’ve emptied most of them while rinsing the set of pans I sudsed and scrubbed.

This particular enemy looked like a kid’s drawing of a spider: a black sun without the top and bottom rays. At least, that’s how much I saw of it as I poured stale but emergency-ready water onto it. I thought I had drowned it until the bottle was empty and the water stopped flowing out of my hands. It scrambled about a little more, and I groaned. I grabbed the last bottle of water (this one from a apple juice container) and poured again, this time, trying to drown it on the end of the tub where I’d pushed it with the other stream of water. No luck.

Fine, I thought. I’ll use another method, one less earth-friendly. Anything to kill this thing so I can take a shower. I opened up the bathroom sink cabinet and pulled out a spray-bottle of chemicals. Strong stuff, and it made the thing shrivel its legs beneath itself in just a few squirts. Okay, another quirt to make sure it’s really done spasming. As embalming fluid, you know.

Disposal of the corpse is the next step. After I brush my hair, like I do every morning now. I haven’t always done so, but that’s another post. Then, the steady stream of water with which I wash my face and also get rid of crawly reminders. The water came out too strongly and it jumped. I jumped. I don’t even want spider corpses touching me. I moved the hair trap that sits over the drain and jumped again. Oh, that’s a clump of hair, not black corpse. I used the hair trap to push the round thing and water from a washcloth to create an opposite stream.

It’s now sitting in the opening of my shower drain. Replace the hair trap and continue daily ritual. The shower water will wash it away. Another battle won.

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About The Original Kate

Along with artistic tendencies, Kate enjoys unusual people and is constantly striving for some sort of nonconformity. Kate offers a perspective that is thoughtful but well-written and full of images within the words. Other tidbits that might intrigue: she has very long auburn hair, and, you guessed it, her favorite color is orange.

Posted on November 21, 2008, in From Rabid-Mormon Land Known As Utah. Bookmark the permalink. 143 Comments.

  1. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  2. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  3. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  4. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

  5. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

  6. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  7. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  8. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  9. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  10. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  11. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.

    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.

      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.

      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.

      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.

        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.

        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!

      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.

      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.

      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.

      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.

        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.

        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  12. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.
    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.
      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.
      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.
      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.
        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.
        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!
      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.
      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.
      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.
      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.
        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.
        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

  13. Tell me why it has to die? Or at least, why it has to die using harsh chemicals? Arachnophobia is normal and all, but I don’t see why the cup and piece of paper method gets ruled out. When it’s outside, it’s doing you good, eating other bugs that bite and swarm. If it has to die, why not a quick smoosh? I think I’m much prefer that to being burned and suffocated with chemicals.
    I’m not a nutso animal rights person, I love a good steak, the bloodier the better, and I have killed bugs before. I just don’t see the point in killing things that are not for food/are not guaranteed to prey on you (like mosquitoes).

    • It has to die by using harsh chemicals because drowning it didn’t work like it usually does. And I don’t have the guts to use a cup and paper. If I smooshed it, I’d be too afraid that it’d stick to the floor rather than the shoe or newspaper. Scraping up the carcass or wiping it up would make me cringe too much.
      Smooshing it is actually my usual method if it were on a wall or on the floor. This was a big bugger, and the tub immediately brought to mind water and then chemicals. Those methods keep me as far away from it physically as possible.
      You actually have the same opinion as Just’In: it’s a harmless bug that’s doing the world good. for months we kept a tiny spider that was living in the corner of our dining room window because it was eating flies. Also, we kept it because it wasn’t in my immediate space. I don’t stand in that spot and it was in the small empty, unused space we have in our apartment.
      In the case of the spider in the bathtub, I felt like it was getting in the way of everyday routine. And the rest of irrationality comes from the arachnaphobia.

      • Fair enough, I suppose. Phobias are not rational by definition, so I suppose I can’t fault anyone for having them! I have phobias myself, so I kind of sort of get it.
        I like the story about your windowsill spider. πŸ™‚

      • That’s story’s not all pleasant. I can’t see the guy, but I can see his web. The sad thing is that he attached his web to the wall (the non-window part in the sill) and to the end of the part of the window that opens. On hot days, we opened our windows in the evenings, especially in this second floor apartment, and that meant that every night, this spider’s web got destroyed. He apparantly didn’t get killed, but every day, he’d rebuild the web.
        Dumb spider. You’d think it’d have enough sense to move somewhere else. It might still be there, for all I know.

    • Yay for being brave enough to kill spiders, Kate!
      I heard that house spiders would die if you put them outside. Same theory as letting tame animals back in the wild. πŸ™‚ Dunno if I believe it though.
      My rationale for killing spiders is that it’s my turf. Spiders would kill things that invaded their turf. I don’t mind them living where I can’t see them, but when they step into sight they’ve broken the rules! We must enforce the rules, otherwise we’ll have a rebellion on our hands.
      I found most spiders are resilient to drowning (they’ll fake you out and then crawl away later), but soap kills em. A little dishsoap or handsoap works fine.
      -Sarah

      • Soap! Great idea, Sarah. Hey, Seattle Kate: you okay with soap as a means of killing said nasty creatures?

      • I think the same principles generally apply (the whole burning and suffocating thing). I’m not sure which would be worse to be smothered in, having thankfully never been smothered by either. I hypothesize that soap would be slightly nicer. In the end it’s dying though, so it probably doesn’t matter too much. I’m not judging really, just considering the various terrible ways to die if one is a spider and the merits of exoskeletons and things like that. I’m a big dork.

      • And a big commenter today. Silly girl. I’m happy you’ve found an escape from your awful job. Isn’t it sad that there are so many awful jobs out there?

      • Commenting is fun! Or at least more fun than what I should be doing. I’m sure you understand.
        I just quit my awful job, which was made more awful by the fact that they communicated very poorly about when payday was. I thought I would have money today, but alas and alack, I will not have money to after Thanksgiving. Time to run out and get another mediocre job, I think!

      • Try a call center? Or a pizza place? Or be a cashier. I’ve done that for the last six months. Once I got over the awful blow (I have my degree and yet I’m working for a dollar store making minimum wage) I realized that I enjoy my co-workers and the work is easy. I occasionally moan about my job when I get home, but it’s not an everyday pain.
        Now that I’ve worked at a dollar store, I’ve decided I like the job of being just cashier. The store makes sure there’s variation so I’m not standing in one spot all day. I wonder what it’d be like at a grocery store?

      • I don’t believe it either, because your house spiders come from somewhere, and that somewhere is usually outside. Unless you’ve noticed egg sacs around your house and lots of little baby spiders, the big spider came from outside. Spiders are fairly resilient to climate, and there are way more bugs to eat outside than inside.

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